The University of Hawaii at Manoa and Southern Christian College are engaged in a three-year higher education partnership to strengthen Southern Christian College's capacity to develop the job skills and improve the livelihoods of rural, out-of-school youth in central Mindanao, the Philippines' southernmost region. The partnership is working under the title, “UPLOAD JOBS for Mindanao” (University Partnership Linking Out-of-School Youth to Agri-Entrepreneurship Development to promote Job Opportunities for Business Scale-up for Mindanao).

The partners are collaborating to implement a range of programs and activities in agricultural entrepreneurship with the goal of increasing the institutional capacity of Southern Christian College in delivering rural workforce development tailored to the employment skills needs of out-of-school youth in the region. High-yield agricultural products such as exotic fruits and vegetables are among the industry sectors that the partners are targeting in the early stages of this partnership.

A key element of the partners' plan is a new Center for Agricultural and Farmland Entrepreneurship at Southern Christian College. This center of excellence will engage and empower out-of-school youth as well as the broader community to achieve sustained income growth through training, one-on-one consulting, and advisory services. Additional activities at the center will focus on creating sustainable partnerships and networks that improve workforce skills, develop employment opportunities for out-of-school youth, and forge collaborations with investors. Curriculum enhancement and the development of extension and outreach programs are also components of UPLOAD JOBS for Mindanao.

At a Glance

Partner Institutions:

University of Hawaii Manoa; Southern Christian College

Region:

Southeast Asia

Dates:

Jun 2012–Jun 2015

Funding Level:

$1,070,495

Proposed
Cost Share:

$209,088

Success Story

Many out-of-school youth in Central Mindanao, Philippines, struggle to maintain successful livelihoods because they lack sufficient workforce skills.

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